Study establishes strong link between nicotine and diabetes complications

Scientists today reported the first strong evidence implicating nicotine as the main culprit responsible for persistently elevated blood sugar levels – and the resulting increased risk of serious health complications – in people who have diabetes and smoke. In a presentation at the 241st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), they […]
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ALCMI launches new CASTLE study to treat lung cancer

The Addario Lung Cancer Medical Institute (ALCMI, voiced as “Alchemy”) today announced the enrollment of the initial subjects into its inaugural clinical trial known as CASTLE, targeting 250 subjects over two years among academic and community medical centers in the United States. CASTLE stands for Collaborative Advanced Stage Tissue Lung Cancer study. ALCMI is an […]
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Targeted Gene Disruption Reveals How Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Develops In Mice

Researchers have described how the most common gene mutation found in acute myeloid leukaemia starts the process of cancer development and how it can cooperate with a well-defined group of other mutations to cause full-blown leukaemia. The researchers suggest that three critical steps are required to transform normal blood cells into leukaemic ones, each subverting […]
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Lupus nephritis ESRD study finds increase in incidence rates among children, African Americans

New research documenting changes in the incidence and outcomes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the U.S. between 1995 and 2006, found a significant increase in incidence rates among patients 5 to 39 years of age and in African Americans. A second related study-the largest pediatric lupus nephritis-associated ESRD study to date-revealed high rates of […]
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Breast cancer specialists offer new technology for patients to detect early-stage lymphedema

Breast cancer specialists at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center are offering patients new ways to detect early signs of lymphedema, a common side effect of breast cancer surgery that causes painful, debilitating and disfiguring swelling in the arms following removal of lymph nodes. As many as 30 percent of women who have breast cancer surgery […]
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New study: Women with early stage breast cancer worry about recurrence

A new study has found that certain types of women with early stage breast cancer are vulnerable to excessive worrying about cancer recurrence. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study also indicates that worrying about cancer recurrence can compromise patients’ medical care and quality of life. Thanks […]
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Study develops new approaches for sorting out complexities of cancer cells

New drugs that specifically target the mutated genes responsible for cancer growth have shown great success in extending the lives of patients, with far fewer side effects than conventional anti-cancer therapies. Unfortunately, many patients become resistant to these drugs due to secondary mutations. Now, a multidisciplinary team of researchers at UCLA has developed a “roadmap” […]
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Study identifies unique adult animal stem cells that can turn into neurons

A group of scientists at Marshall University is conducting research that may someday lead to new treatments for repair of the central nervous system. Dr. Elmer M. Price, who heads the research team and is chairman of Marshall’s Department of Biological Sciences, said his group has identified and analyzed unique adult animal stem cells that […]
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Osteoporotic hip and vertebral fractures have most serious impact on quality of life

A study presented today at the European Congress on Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis currently taking place in Valencia, Spain has found that the initial quality of life loss following an osteoporotic fracture is substantial, especially with regard to hip and vertebral fractures. The study found differences in quality of life loss between countries after correcting for […]
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First evidence of H5N1 transmission between domestic farms and wild birds

Wild migratory birds may indeed play a role in the spread of bird flu, also known as highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1. A study by the U.S. Geological Survey, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization and the Chinese Academy of Sciences used satellites, outbreak data and genetics to uncover an unknown link in Tibet […]
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Slew of SCH events to mark World TB Day

DOHA: Tuberculosis (TB) claimed at least two lives last year while more than 500 new cases were diagnosed here, according to an expert. Qatar marked World TB Day (WTD), recently, as a reminder that this very ancient killing disease is still going around silently affecting millions of people every year with about 2 million people […]
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Osteoporosis study: Protelos have significant bone-forming activity than bisphosphonates

Protelos(R) (strontium ranelate) has significantly greater bone-forming activity than the commonly prescribed bisphosphonate, alendronate, according to results of the largest-ever biopsy study in post-menopausal women presented today at the European Congress on Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ECCEO11-IOF) in Valencia. Through its unique dual impact on both bone formation and resorption, Protelos substantially reduces fracture risk, the […]
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Scientists identify protein that plays a key role in cancer treatment resistance

Research led by Daitoku Sakamuro, PhD, Assistant Professor of Pathology at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans and the LSUHSC Stanley S. Scott Cancer Center, has identified a protein that enables the activation of a DNA-repair enzyme that protects cancer cells from catastrophic damage caused by chemo and radiation therapy. This protein, called c-MYC oncoprotein, […]
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