Fluorescent near-infrared probe, PSS-794 promises the tissue imaging of cancers

A cell dying of Apoptosis

Medical imaging is the technique that is used to generate images of human body or parts for clinical purposes or medical science.  Revolutionary advances in imaging technology provides a superior  method for imaging apoptosis.  A  team of researchers from the University of Notre Dame and the Washington University School of Medicine elucidates the method of using a synthetic probe to target against dead and dying cells in mammary and prostate tumors. The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health, Notre Dame’s Walther Cancer Center and the Notre Dame Integrated Imaging Facility.

The research team had previously revealed the use of fluorescent near infrared probe,  PSS-794 to image the bacterial infections in mice.  The study indicate that PSS-794 has a remarkable capacity to selectively target anionic cells in living animals.  Currently the researchers explains the development off animals imaging capability of PSS-794.  The study focused on mammary and prostate tumors, imaging of cell death is broadly useful for treatment of numerous conditions, including cardiovascular disease, neurology, renal disease and even transplant rejection. Interestingly, the research is a key step towards the development of optical imaging probes that could determine, noninvasively, the amount and type of cell death in tumors.  Also these imaging techniques could help clinicians accurately determine the grade of tumors and the stage of cancers, as well as to measure the effectiveness of treatments.

The team hopes that the developed analogous probes would be used for deep tissue imaging of cancers in humans.  Bradley D. Smith, Professor explained that the imaging of cell death is useful for treatment for numerous conditions, including cardiovascular disease, neurology, renal disease and even transplant rejection.