Brain growth in babies linked to amount of time and energy mothers ‘invest’

Brain growth in babies is linked to the amount of time and energy mothers ‘invest’, according to new research published today. The study of 128 mammal species, including humans, shows that brain growth in babies is determined by the duration of pregnancy and how long they suckle. The Durham University research concludes that the longer […]
Continue reading…

 

MIT: New Blood-testing Device Can Quickly Spot Cancer Cells, HIV

A Harvard bioengineer and an MIT aeronautical engineer have created a new device that can detect single cancer cells in a blood sample, potentially allowing doctors to quickly determine whether cancer has spread from its original site. The microfluidic device, described in the March 17 online edition of the journal Small, is about the size […]
Continue reading…

 

Doctors See More Children With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Once a medical rarity in children, inflammatory bowel disease today is increasingly common in kids, but many of them may not be diagnosed in a timely manner, according to experts from the Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center at Johns Hopkins Children’s. Gastroenterologists there say that many of the hundreds of children they see were referred […]
Continue reading…

 

New Hemoglobin Monitor May Help Guide Transfusion Decisions

A spectrophotometric hemoglobin (SpHb) sensor may become a useful new approach to noninvasive monitoring of blood hemoglobin levels during surgery, reports a study in the April issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia, official journal of the International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS). The SpHb technology could reduce the need for invasive monitoring or the need for blood […]
Continue reading…

 

UK Scientists Move Closer To Discovering Cause Of Alzheimer’s

UK scientists have taken another step forward in their search to identify the causes of Alzheimer’s. Important research which sheds new light on one of the key building blocks of the disease was presented at an Alzheimer’s Society research roadshow in Southampton last Thursday. Dr Amritpal Mudher from Southampton University was speaking about her findings […]
Continue reading…

 

Cancer drug Gleevec may hold promise against scleroderma: Study

A drug approved to treat certain types of cancer has shown promising results in the treatment of patients with scleroderma, according to results from an open-label Phase II trial. While the drug’s efficacy must be demonstrated in a Phase III trial, the gold standard for testing a drug, researchers are optimistic that Gleevec- (imatinib) could […]
Continue reading…

 

Plasmid containing Sindbis replicase genes can destruct lung cancer

Alpha viruses, such as Sindbis virus, carry their genetic information on a single strand of RNA. On infection they use a protein, replicase, to produce double stranded RNA (dsRNA) which is used as genetic material to make more viruses. However the body recognizes dsRNA as foreign, and infected cells initiate an immune response. New research […]
Continue reading…

 

FDA approves ipilimumab to treat metastatic melanoma

The US Food and Drug Administration announced today that the drug ipilimumab (brand name Yervoy) has been approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma. It is the first drug ever shown to improve overall survival for patients with advanced melanoma. Ipilimumab uses a novel approach known as immunotherapy, which exploits the body’s own […]
Continue reading…

 

First open fetal surgery to treat lung malformations performed at Texas Children’s Hospital

Experts from Texas Children’s Fetal Center published a study that appears in volume 46, issue 2 of the Journal of Pediatric Surgery documenting the first successful cases of open fetal surgery to treat fetal lung malformations in the Southern U.S. The study also provides improved data to diagnose, assess, predict risk, and recommend treatment for […]
Continue reading…

 

Researchers discover LRRK2 gene mutation may cause Parkinson’s disease

Researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine have discovered a way that mutations in a gene called LRRK2 may cause the most common inherited form of Parkinson’s disease. The study, published online this month in the journal Public Library of Science, shows that upon specific modification called phosphorylation, LRRK2 protein binds to a family of […]
Continue reading…

 

Study establishes strong link between nicotine and diabetes complications

Scientists today reported the first strong evidence implicating nicotine as the main culprit responsible for persistently elevated blood sugar levels – and the resulting increased risk of serious health complications – in people who have diabetes and smoke. In a presentation at the 241st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), they […]
Continue reading…