Why Afternoon Open Heart Surgery Is Better for Patient Outcomes

Open heart surgery is linked to better patient outcomes when carried out in the afternoon, rather than in the morning, according to a study published yesterday (October 26) in The Lancet. The reasons have to do with circadian rhythms, and the risk of heart damage following operation, researchers report. “Our study found that post-surgery heart […]
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Do bacteria have sense of touch?

Although bacteria have no sensory organs in the classical sense, they are still masters in perceiving their environment. A research group at the University of Basel’s Biozentrum has now discovered that bacteria not only respond to chemical signals, but also possess a sense of touch. In their recent publication in Science, the researchers demonstrate how […]
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The brain can re-map advanced artificial limbs

Targeted motor and sensory reinnervation (TMSR) is a surgical procedure on patients with amputations that reroutes residual limb nerves towards intact muscles and skin in order to fit them with a limb prosthesis allowing unprecedented control. By its nature, TMSR changes the way the brain processes motor control and somatosensory input; however the detailed brain […]
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Adderall Misuse May Be Hidden Part of Teen Amphetamine Abuse

American teens underestimate their use of amphetamines, likely because many don’t know that the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) drug Adderall is an amphetamine, a new study suggests. High school and college students sometimes use Adderall, a type of stimulant medication, without a doctor’s order because they believe it will boost their mental function and school performance. […]
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A healthy heart may protect older adults from disability

  A healthy heart is important to the well-being of older adults. The American Heart Association (AHA) defines “ideal cardiovascular health” based on four health behaviors (current smoking, body mass index, physical activity, and healthy diet and three health factors (total cholesterol, blood pressure), and fasting blood glucose level). Recently, a team of researchers studied […]
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Does smell sensitivity change everyday?

It has always been apparent that some individuals have a better sense of smell than others, but a new study of 37 teens provides the first direct evidence that within each person, smell sensitivity varies over the course of each day. The pattern, according to the data, tracks with the body’s internal day-night cycle, or […]
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Eating more fruits, vegetables boosts psychological well-being

Fruits and vegetables are a pivotal part of a healthful diet, but their benefits are not limited to physical health. New research finds that increasing fruit and vegetable consumption may improve psychological well-being in as little as 2 weeks. Study leader Dr. Tamlin Conner, of the Department of Psychology at the University of Otago in […]
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Insulin Use During, After Meals Raises Risk Of Non-Adherence

Individuals with type 2 diabetes who use bolus insulin during or after meals have a greater risk of non-adherence and poorer glycemic control than those who use insulin prior to meals, according to a recent analysis. For their analysis, the researchers evaluated 1483 adult participants with type 2 diabetes from 12 countries in a web-based, […]
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Cannabis can help children with epilepsy

Medical cannabinoids may benefit children undergoing chemotherapy and those who have epilepsy, according to a new study. Authors emphasized the need to weigh the risks and benefits of the drug and called for more research on pediatric use. “In this context, pediatricians, families, patients and policy makers continue to lack urgently needed information to make […]
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Teens don’t get enough sleep

  If you’re a young person who can’t seem to get enough sleep, you’re not alone: A new study led by San Diego State University Professor of Psychology Jean Twenge finds that adolescents today are sleeping fewer hours per night than older generations. One possible reason? Young people are trading their sleep for smartphone time. […]
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Arsenic: A cause of cancer?

A new paper published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute shows that arsenic in drinking water may have one of the longest dormancy periods of any carcinogen. By tracking the mortality rates of people exposed to arsenic-contaminated drinking water in a region in Chile, the researchers provide evidence of increases in lung, bladder, […]
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Lucid dreaming could be real

In the 2010 film “Inception,” Cobb (Leonardo DiCaprio) describes his wife Mal’s trick for discerning reality from the fantastic dreamscape in which most of the film takes place: He uses what he calls a totem, a spinning top that will never fall over while he’s dreaming. But a totem, known to psychologists who study lucid […]
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